Halloween safety tips: 4 ways to drive safe during trick-or-treating

 October 22, 2019     UFG Insurance    Personal 

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Jaywalking, turn signals and crosswalks, oh my.

Yup, it’s that time of year again—it’s time to celebrate All Hallows Eve. Or Halloween, as some of you know it.

Halloween activities include costume parties, carving pumpkins and everyone’s favorite: trick-or-treating! Often between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., children across the nation take part in going door-to-door doing their best for full-size candy bars. Along with ghouls and goblins, here are some Halloween safety tips you should know.

Here are four ways to help you drive safely during trick-or-treating.

1. Go slower than normal

It’s a good idea to go slower than the speed limit on Halloween, especially with the increase in foot traffic. Encourage your kids to cross at street corners and crosswalks, but beware because not every child follows the rules—shocker, we know. Children are so excited that they may forget basic safety rules when crossing the street. The sweet taste of candy and a flashing green porch light might be enough to make them cross right in the middle of the road. While some people decorate their kids with glow sticks and/or reflective tape, not everyone does this. Keep your eyes peeled for kids running around at dusk—especially those in dark costumes.

2. Always yield to pedestrians

When it comes to food safety, there’s a saying: “When in doubt, throw it out.” The same concept applies to yielding to pedestrians.

Did you know?

Kids are more than twice as likely to get hit and killed by a car on Halloween as on any other day of the year. It’s true according to Safe Kids Worldwide.

As a general rule, always yield to children on Halloween (and beyond) because you don’t know what’s going on in their sugar-crazed mind. Even if they wait patiently, it might be best to signal to them to go on. That way you know there’s no chance of an accident happening. When it comes to Halloween safety tips, you’re better safe than sorry.

3. Put down the phone. Period.

Distracted driving has no place in our society, let alone on a rowdy day like Halloween. When you’re driving there is no reason you need to have your phone out. If you must use your phone, please make sure you pull over on the side of the road and put your car in “park” before grabbing your phone. Many people say it’s a good idea to put your cell phone in your glove compartment or hide it in the car console to keep you from using it while driving. Plus, you’re setting a good example for your backseat race car drivers.
That’s why we created UFG Worth It. Worth It is an educational awareness program to remind drivers that life is worth it, driving distracted is not. Distracted driving may change your life forever. Make sure you think about your family, friends and future the next time you grab your phone while driving, because life is worth it.

Take the pledge today and don’t drive distracted on Halloween.

4. Use your signals 

It may seem simple, but as a driver, using your signals allows you to communicate with other drivers. Pedestrians also recognize signals and letting those around your car know what your plan is may help prevent accidents. Even if you are dropping off or picking up your own little pumpkins, make sure your four-way flashers are on. Also, it’s a best practice to instruct children to get out of the vehicle on the side that is closest to the sidewalk. On Halloween—and every other day for that matter—you can’t always trust other drivers, and having kids exit the car on the sidewalk is the safest option.

Taking all of these tips into account will help your family have a safe, fun-filled Halloween. You might end up with too many bags of chocolate, but if that’s the worst that happens, then it was a good night.

Lastly, make sure you don’t drive distracted, because the smiles on your kid’s faces are worth it. Life can change in an instant. Remember what’s worth it to you before you get behind the wheel. Take our pledge to not drive distracted and tell us what’s #worthit to you on social media.

Happy trick-or-treating!

 


The information provided is for informational purposes only. Every attempt is made to ensure that the information is accurate; however, it is not intended to replace professional advice. For more information, see Disclaimers & Other Legal Documents.